Philosophy and Religious Studies

Hibbard Humanities Hall 632
715-836-2545
www.uwec.edu/philrel

Philosophy is the disciplined and critical inquiry into fundamental questions of human existence: What is the nature of reality? What is knowledge? Does God exist? Is my will free? What is the difference between right and wrong? What is the relation between the mind and the body? What is the meaning of life?, etc. Philosophers use reason and argument in the attempt to answer these questions. Philosophy is at the very heart of a liberal education. Students of philosophy learn to think critically and clearly, argue forcefully, and read carefully. They also learn how the history of philosophy has shaped modern thought and culture. A major in philosophy is excellent preparation for advanced study in a wide range of fields, including law. A minor in philosophy will enrich and complement any major field of study.

Religious Studies is the multi-disciplinary exploration of the phenomena of human experience commonly called “religious.” This includes study of the genesis and interpretation of religious texts; the formation, history, beliefs, and practices of religious communities and traditions; the role of religion in society and culture; issues in religion and science, including the psychology of religious experience; religion in literature and the arts; religious morality; philosophy of religion. The academic study of religion provides an excellent “window” into other cultures, while enhancing students’ understanding of their own society and its history. A degree in Religious Studies provides an excellent foundation for a wide range of careers as well as preparing students for demanding graduate programs.

Student Organizations

Theta Alpha Kappa (Honor Society in Religious Studies)

Philosophy Club

Honors Program in Philosophy and Religious Studies

The Honors Program in Philosophy and Religious studies enables outstanding students to engage in challenging Honors coursework and creative Honors research experiences.

Eligibility: Admission is by departmental invitation to students who have demonstrated excellent intellectual potential. To be considered, students must have a minimum 3.5 GPA in the major and in all university coursework.

Requirements:

1) Complete an Honors Capstone Thesis as the outcome of the departmental seminar — either Phil 485 (Seminar in Problems in Philosophy) or Rels 490 (Seminar in Religious Studies) — or an appropriately crafted Independent Study project.

2) Present the thesis research at or in a suitable local, regional, or national venue.

Faculty

Pamela Forman, Interim Chair

Charlene Burns

Steven Fink
Robert Greene

Yaakov Levi
Sean McAleer
Matthew Meyer
Kristin Schaupp
Martin Webb
 

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy (3 crs)

An introduction to philosophy through exploration of philosophical problems (e.g., the nature of knowledge, the nature of morality, free will, the rationality of religious faith) or exploration of canonical texts (e.g., Plato's Republic, Descartes' Meditations).

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 120 Ethical Reasoning (3 crs)

Prerequisite: No credit if taken after PHIL 220.

Prepares students to reason coherently, critically, and creatively about ethical issues by analyzing arguments and positions on contemporary moral problems in light of relevant concepts, distinctions, values, and theories.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R3 Civic and Environmental Issues

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 150 Logic and Critical Thinking (3 crs)

Prerequisite: No credit if taken after PHIL 250.

Introduction to principles and methods of critical thinking, sound reasoning, and argument evaluation. A combination of formal and informal techniques will be used. Moral, legal, and scientific reasoning may be considered.

Attributes: GE IB Communication-Analytical Skills

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 200 What is Happiness? (3 crs)

Explores happiness though philosophical, religious, and psychological approaches.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-I1 Integration, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 235 Ancient Philosophy (3 crs)

History of philosophy from the early Greeks through Plotinus, stressing the contributions of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 250 Symbolic Logic (3 crs)

Introduction to formal logic. Sentential logic, quantificational logic, and other selected topics. Slightly more formal and covers more areas than Philosophy 150.

Attributes: GE IB Communication-Analytical Skills

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 291 Special Topics (1-3 crs)

Content to be determined by department on initiative of students and faculty, on topics such as persons and movements in philosophy, ethnic and comparative themes and interdisciplinary syntheses.

PHIL 301 Ethics in the Professions and the Community (3 crs)

Prerequisite: Limited to organizational leadership and communication comprehensive major, Bachelor of Professional Studies degree.

A survey of major ethical theories and their applications in the professions and in community affairs, including key ethical issues in medicine, law, business, computing, and government.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities, BPS Flat Rate Tuition

Grading Basis: A-F Grades Only

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 305 Ethics and Business (3 crs)

Major theories of corporate responsibility and their relationships to the personal and social dimensions of business life.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 306 Ethics of Health Care (3 crs)

Major ethical theories and their applications to personal and professional dimensions of health care functions. Survey of ethical problems that arise in health care situations through case studies.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, Undergraduate/Graduate Offering

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 308 Ethics in Computing and Engineering (3 crs)

A topical introduction to ethical issues raised by computer technology and engineering, with special attention to the professional ethics of software engineering and computer organization and design. Combines theoretical frameworks with case studies to develop competence in informed ethical decision-making.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 310 Philosophy of Law (3 crs)

A philosophical investigation into the law's nature and limits, with a focus on criminal law. Topics include legal liberalism, legal moralism, legal paternalism, self-defense, blackmail, legal positivism, natural law theory, punishment, rights, law and economics, and the duty to obey the law.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 316 Metaphysics (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Explores major topics in metaphysics. Topics include universals and particulars, identity and change, necessity and essence, causation, free will and determinism, space and time, and mind and body.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 317 Epistemology (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Epistemology, or the theory of knowledge, explores major theories concerning the nature of knowledge, belief, and justification. Topics include skepticism, induction, a priori knowledge, foundationalism and coherentism, and internalism and externalism.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 320 Environmental Ethics (3 crs)

Prerequisite: BIOL 180, or GEOG 178, or GEOL 115, or ECON 268; or one course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Introduces major theoretical approaches to ethical and policy questions concerning environmental issues such as population growth, famine, nonhuman animals, atmospheric conditions, hazardous waste, preservation of species, pollution, pesticides, and nuclear power.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R3 Civic and Environmental Issues

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 322 Philosophy of Language (3 crs)

Prerequisite: At least one course in philosophy or ENGL 221 or consent of instructor.

Philosophic investigation into the structure and function of language, with emphasis on discursive meaning.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 325 Aesthetics (3 crs)

Acquaints students with some of the more fruitful philosophic investigations concerning the creative process, the work of art, the relationship between art and society.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K4 Fine Arts, LE-S3 Creativity

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 328 Philosophy and Film (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

An examination of ethical, aesthetic and existential issues involved in both popular and documentary films. The perspectives examined will include feminist and multicultural approaches.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 2.5

Lab/Studio Hours: 2

PHIL 331 Philosophical Ethics (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

An advanced course in moral philosophy comprising both normative ethical theory, the inquiry into the nature of right action, and metaethics, the second-order inquiry into the nature of moral judgment itself. Philosophers studied include historical figures (e.g., Arisototle, Hume, Kant, Mill) and contemporary authors as well.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 332 Philosophical Perspectives on Friendship (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

An examination of philosophical thinking on the nature and value of friendship. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Cicero, Aquinas, Montaigne, Bacon, Kierkegaard, Kant, and contemporary philosophical authors.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 333 History of Ethics (3 crs)

Prerequisite: At least one course in philosophy or consent of the instructor.

A study of ethical thought of philosophers from a historical era in philosophy, typically either ancient or modern. Authors studied include Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Epicurus, Cicero; Hume, Shaftsbury, Hutcheson, Butler, Bentham, Price.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 334 Philosophical Perspectives on Forgiveness (3 crs)

Prerequisite: At least one course in philosophy or consent of the instructor.

A philosophical investigation of the nature and value of forgiveness. Is a disposition to forgiveness a virtue? Is forgiveness always good, or conditionally good? Are third-party and self-forgiveness coherent? Are certain acts unforgivable? Both classical, modern, and contemporary authors will be read.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 335 Early Modern Philosophy (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

The history of philosophy from Descartes to Hume. Examines proposals by leading philosophers regarding the foundations of scientific, moral, religious, and political beliefs.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 338 Modern European Philosophy I (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Explores a pivotal era in European thought, starting with Kant's revolutionary inversion of the subject-object relation. The development of the dialectical systems by his successors set the tone for the next two centuries of Continental philosophy.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 339 Modern European Philosophy II (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Explores contemporary Continental European philosophy, especially that of Germany and France, from Husserl and Heidegger through Gadamer and Derrida. The movements of phenomenology, hermeneutics, deconstruction, and postmodernism will be emphasized.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 340 Knowledge and Reality (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Explores the philosophy of the English-speaking world during the past century, from Frege and Wittgenstein through Davidson and Putnam. Emphasizes the movements of logical positivism, ordinary language analysis, and American pragmatism.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 343 Philosophy of Mind (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

The relation between the mind and the brain; the nature of consciousness; the philosophy of psychology and mental illness; artificial and animal intelligence; the nature of the emotions; free will and determinism.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 345 Philosophy of Religion (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor or RELS 210, RELS 315, RELS 350, RELS 470; or RELS 353/WMNS 353; or RELS 450/PHIL 450.

• Credit may not be earned in both PHIL 345 and RELS 345.

Critical study of the subject of religion, including the nature, grounds, and limits of religious claims.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, Undergraduate/Graduate Offering

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 355 Philosophy of Science (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in biology, chemistry, geology, physics, physical geography; or one course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

The nature of scientific knowledge and progress; the structure of fundamental theories in physics and biology; the demarcation between science and pseudo-science; science and religion; science and gender; social and ethical implications of modern science.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 365 Existentialism (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Central ideas in existential thought. Leading existentialist thinkers including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, deBeauvoir, and the phenomenologist Husserl.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 377 Philosophy and Feminism (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or women's studies.

• Credit may not be earned in both PHIL 377 and WMNS 377.

A study of recent trends in feminist philosophy with emphasis upon feminist thinking in the areas of ethics, social philosophy, and theory of knowledge.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R1 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 386 Philosophical Classics (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

A close reading of one or more philosophical classics, chosen by theme or author. Texts vary from offering to offering.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits

PHIL 395 Directed Studies (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Minimum sophomore standing.

Consent: Department Consent Required

•Recommended for non-majors.

Work with instructor on a specific philosophical issue, problem, or activity. Content of the course to be determined by the student and the instructor.

Attributes: Undergraduate/Graduate Offering

Repeat: Course may be repeated

PHIL 396 Research Apprenticeship in Philosophy (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Qualified students, recruited and closely supervised by an instructor, engage in a research project with the faculty member.

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits

PHIL 397 Student Academic Apprenticeship in Philosophy (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Limited to philosophy majors and minors. Minimum junior standing.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Qualified students, selected and supervised by an instructor, assist teaching and learning in a course within the department while working closely with a faculty member.

Attributes: Service-Learning Optional Half

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits

PHIL 399 Independent Study - Juniors (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Minimum junior standing.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Individual project under the direction of a faculty member.

Repeat: Course may be repeated

PHIL 485 Seminar in Problems of Philosophy (3 crs)

Prerequisite: Limited to philosophy majors and minors. Minimum junior standing. Other majors and minors will be permitted with consent of instructor.

Advanced study of problems in philosophy of mind, meta-ethics, theory of knowledge, political and social philosophy, philosophy of logic, or history of philosophy. Content is variable and is determined by the instructor.

Repeat: Course may be repeated

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 498 Internship in Philosophy (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Limited to philosophy majors and minors. Minimum sophomore standing.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Assignment in an area of philosophy emphasizing practical experience in the applied professional aspects of the discipline. Students will work closely with an internship supervisor or faculty member engaged in professional or occupational projects in the field.

Attributes: Service-Learning, Half 15 Hours, Internship

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits

Grading Basis: S/U Only Grade Basis

PHIL 499 Independent Study - Seniors (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Minimum senior standing.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Individual project under the direction of a faculty member.

Repeat: Course may be repeated

PHIL 506 Ethics of Health Care (3 crs)

• Cross-listed with PHIL 306. Credit may not be earned in both courses.

Major ethical theories and their applications to personal and professional dimensions of health care functions. Survey of ethical problems that arise in health care situations through case studies.

Grading Basis: No S/U Grade Option

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 545 Philosophy of Religion (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor or RELS 210, RELS 315, RELS 350, RELS 470; or RELS 353/WMNS 353; or RELS 450/PHIL 450.

• Cross-listed with PHIL 345 and RELS 345/RELS 545. Credit may only be earned in one of these courses.

Critical study of the subject of religion, including the nature, grounds, and limits of religious claims.

Grading Basis: No S/U Grade Option

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

PHIL 595 Directed Studies (1-3 crs)

Consent: Department Consent Required

• Cross-listed with PHIL 395.

Work with instructor on a specific philosophical issue, problem, or activity. Content of the course to be determined by the student and the instructor. Recommended for non-majors.

Repeat: Course may be repeated

Grading Basis: No S/U Grade Option

PHIL 797 Independent Study (1-3 crs)

Consent: Department Consent Required

Individual project under the direction of a faculty member.

Repeat: Course may be repeated

Grading Basis: No S/U Grade Option

Religious Studies (RELS)

RELS 100 Introduction to the Religions of the World (3 crs)

Basic teachings of the world's major religions including tribal traditions, Western religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), Indian religions (Hinduism and Buddhism), and Far Eastern religions (Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto).

Attributes: Foreign Culture, Cultural Diversity 1 cr., GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-DDIV Design for Diversity, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R1 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 110 Basic Issues in Religion (3 crs)

A study of the meaning of religion, the nature of religious thought, and an examination of such issues as God, salvation, evil, and selected topics in the relation between religion and the secular world.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R2 Global Perspectives

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 203 Women and World Religions (3 crs)

• Credit may not be earned in both RELS 203 and WMNS 203. No credit if taken after ANTH 354 or RELS 354.

Surveys women's religious lives historically and cross-culturally, focusing on pre-patriarchal religions and non-Western traditions. Attention will be given to goddesses in world religions. The course will end with feminist issues in world religions.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, Cultural Diversity 1 cr., GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-DDIV Design for Diversity, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R1 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 210 Religion and Morality (3 crs)

Relations between religious meanings and moral values among majority and minority religions of Eastern and Western cultures.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-R1 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 230 Old Testament/Hebrew Bible (3 crs)

Scriptural heritage from ancient Israel which has profoundly influenced Western civilization; the resources of recent Biblical studies are utilized.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 240 New Testament (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies.

A unified study of the New Testament from historical, theological, and literary perspectives. Contributions of recent Biblical scholarship included.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 290 Sacred Earth: Religion and Nature (3 crs)

Sacred Earth explores the historical, cultural, religious, and spiritual concerns of humanity's relationship with "Nature" and environments, converging varieties or cultural expressions of the "sacred earth" in religious traditions, contemporary society, environmentalism, and science.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, Cultural Diversity 1 cr., GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 291 Special Topics (1-3 crs)

Topics, issues, literature, or movements not typically covered in regular religious study courses and of special interest to students and faculty.

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 303 Early Christianity (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies or philosophy.

Principal ideas, movements, and persons in the development of Christianity from the New Testament Church to the Reformation.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R2 Global Perspectives

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 304 Modern Christianity (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies or philosophy.

Principal ideas, movements, and persons in the development of Christianity from the Reformation to the twenty-first century.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-R2 Global Perspectives

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 307 Judaism (3 crs)

Judaism from its earliest times to the twenty-first century, including its history, literature, and lifestyles.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, Undergraduate/Graduate Offering

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 309 Islam (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies.

Introduction to the main elements of Islam, through study of its history, the role of Muhammad, the Qur'an, basic beliefs and observances, the dynamics of the movement, and its current world status and influence.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 312 Buddhism: Past and Present (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies or philosophy.

Study of central teachings, practices, and institutions of major sects of Buddhism, both past and present. Emphasis on development of Buddhist thought in India and on Buddhism as practiced by several contemporary forms of Buddhism.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R2 Global Perspectives

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 313 Tibetan Buddhism (3 crs)

Prerequisite: RELS 100 or RELS 312 or consent of instructor

Explores Tibetan Buddhism through Tibetan literature in translation and studies of Tibetan history and culture. Main themes are creative tensions between elite and popular religion, domestication of Buddhism in Tibet, and ongoing development of Tibetan Buddhism in the contemporary world.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R2 Global Perspectives

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 314 Hinduism (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies or philosophy.

A survey of aspects of Hinduism utilizing secondary and primary sources. The Upanishads, Yoga, Tantrism, village and temple Hinduism. Emphasis on philosophical developments and lifestyles.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 315 Psychology of Religion (3 crs)

An examination of the human experience, using languages of psychology and religion to understand what religion means.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-I1 Integration

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 323 Chinese and Japanese Religions (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies or philosophy. No credit if taken after RELS 317, RELS 319 and/or RELS 320.

Examines the formative religions of China and Japan, including Chinese and Japanese folk religions, the Religion of the I Ching (Yin/Yang), Confucianism, Taoism, Neo-Confucianism, and Shinto.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 326 Asian Religious Philosophies (3 crs)

Prerequisite: RELS 312, RELS 314, or RELS 323; or one course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

• Credit may not be earned in both PHIL 326 and RELS 326.

Philosophical approaches to major religious traditions of India, China, and Japan. Included will be Hindu, Buddhist, Yin-Yang, Taoist, and Neo-Confucian thinkers. The course will conclude with a consideration of the Kyoto School's attempted synthesis of Western and Eastern thought.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 330 Indigenous Religions of the Americas (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in RELS, PHIL, AIS, LAS, or consent of instructor.

• Credit may not be earned in both RELS 330 and AIS 330.

This course will introduce indigenous religions in the cultural contexts of Latin America and North American Indian nations. It will study historical religious development from Pre-Columbian, through colonial experience, to present day cultural movements.

Attributes: Foreign Culture, Cultural Diversity 2 cr., GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 334 Music in Judaism, Christianity and Islam (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies.

• No credit if taken after IDIS 354 when offered as Music of Devotion.

This course addresses music in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. A variety of traditional and contemporary musical styles will be considered, with emphasis on how these styles have shaped Jewish, Christian, and Muslim devotion.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 342 African American Religion (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One RELS course or permission of the instructor.

• No credit if taken after RELS 490 when offered as African American Religious Experience.

Lecture/Discussion Hours; 3An examination of African American religion in the past and present. In addition to a substantial focus on the Christian tradition, significant attention is given to other perspectives including Vodou and the Nation of Islam.

Attributes: Cultural Diversity 3 cr., GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-DDIV Design for Diversity, LE-K3 Humanities, LE-R1 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 345 Philosophy of Religion (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor or RELS 210, RELS 315, RELS 350, RELS 470; or RELS 353/WMNS 353; or RELS 450/PHIL 450.

• Credit may not be earned in both PHIL 345 and RELS 345.

Critical study of the subject of religion, including the nature, grounds, and limits of religious claims.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, Undergraduate/Graduate Offering

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 348 Religious Themes in Literature (3 crs)

An exploration of religious beliefs and practices of diverse people through literature. A portion of the course will focus on works of African American, Native American, Hispanic American, and Southeast Asian American authors.

Attributes: Cultural Diversity 1 cr., GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 378 The Holocaust, 1933-1945 (3 crs)

The destruction by the Nazis of Jewish life in Europe, with reference to its sociological and political dimensions.

Attributes: GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 390 Religion in America (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies.

America's many religious traditions from the colonial period to the present, emphasizing diversity of religious expressions, development and transformation on American soil, commonalities and conflicts, and challenges to a pluralistic United States.

Attributes: Cultural Diversity 1 cr., GE IVB Humanities-Philosophy/Religious Studies, LE-K3 Humanities

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 395 Directed Studies (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Minimum sophomore standing.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Study of a particular problem or special area in the field of comparative religion studies.

Repeat: Course may be repeated

RELS 396 Research Apprenticeship in Religious Studies (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Qualified students, recruited and closely supervised by an instructor, engage in a research project with the faculty member.

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits

RELS 397 Student Academic Apprenticeship in Religious Studies (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in religious studies.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Qualified students, selected and supervised by an instructor, assist teaching and learning in a course within the department while working closely with a faculty member.

Attributes: Service-Learning Optional Half

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits

RELS 399 Independent Study - Juniors (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Minimum junior standing.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Individual project under the direction of a faculty member.

Repeat: Course may be repeated

RELS 470 The Problem of Evil (3 crs)

Prerequisite: Two courses in religious studies. Limited to religious studies majors and minors, or consent of instructor.

Exploration of the problem of evil for Eastern and Western religious thought. Theological, philosophical, psychological, and popular cultural explanations will be examined.

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 490 Seminar in Religious Studies (3 crs)

Prerequisite: Limited to religious studies majors and minors. Minimum junior standing, or consent of instructor.

The content of the seminar is determined by the department in designating the instructor.

Attributes: LE-S3 Creativity

Repeat: Course may be repeated

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 491 Special Topics (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Minimum sophomore standing.

• May be repeated if topics differ with permission of adviser or department chair.

Content will be determined by initiative of students and department, such as topics in comparative religions, scriptural research, historical and systematic theology, sects, and movements.

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 498 Internship in Religious Studies (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Limited to religious studies majors and minors.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Assignment in an area of religious studies emphasizing practical experience in the technical or professional aspects of the discipline. Interns will work closely with a professional in the field.

Attributes: Service-Learning Optional Half, Internship

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits

RELS 499 Independent Study - Seniors (1-3 crs)

Prerequisite: Minimum senior standing.

Consent: Department Consent Required

Individual project under the direction of a faculty member.

Repeat: Course may be repeated

RELS 507 Judaism (3 crs)

• Cross-listed with RELS 307. Credit may not be earned in both courses.

Judaism from its earliest times to the twenty-first century, including its history, literature, and lifestyles.

Grading Basis: No S/U Grade Option

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 545 Philosophy of Religion (3 crs)

Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or consent of instructor or RELS 210, RELS 315, RELS 350, RELS 470; or RELS 353/WMNS 353; or RELS 450/PHIL 450.

• Cross-listed with RELS 345 and PHIL 345/PHIL 545. Credit may only be earned in one of these courses.

Critical study of the subject of religion, including the nature, grounds, and limits of religious claims.

Grading Basis: No S/U Grade Option

Lecture/Discussion Hours: 3

Lab/Studio Hours: 0

RELS 797 Independent Study (1-3 crs)

Individual project under the direction of a faculty member.

Repeat: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits

Grading Basis: No S/U Grade Option