Pre-Professional Programs

Pre-professional programs help students prepare for entrance into professional degree programs. Many professional degree programs are offered only at the post-baccalaureate level, so an undergraduate degree is needed before enrolling in them. UW-Eau Claire offers a variety of academic majors that provide excellent preparation for applying to such professional programs. Students interested in these programs should select an academic major that will prepare them to compete for such programs (many are highly selective) as well as provide career alternatives. For other professional degree programs, students transfer to another higher education institution to complete the appropriate professional degree.

Pre-professional programs are not academic degree programs (that is, they are not academic majors, minors, or certificates). Instead, pre-professional programs provide an organized approach to academic advising for students intending to apply to a professional degree program. To enhance academic planning and preparation while enrolled at UW-Eau Claire, a student interested in obtaining a professional degree should:

  • Work with a pre-professional advisor who can help plan an appropriate curriculum in the field of interest.
  • Obtain information from other colleges/universities regarding specific academic requirements for the professional degree program of interest.
  • Declare an academic major that is logically connected to the professional field, and work with an advisor in the academic major.

Pre-Chiropractic

(Code 704-900)

Advisor: M. Mattes (Kinesiology).

The pre-chiropractic program is intended to prepare students for admission into a chiropractic college. Most accredited chiropractic colleges prefer that students earn a baccalaureate degree before beginning, or concurrently with, their chiropractic training. Because the specific requirements of professional schools vary considerably, students should obtain current academic catalogs from the schools in which they are interested. The pre-chiropractic program is an advising track and not a major, minor, or certificate program. Interested students should select an appropriate major in consultation with an academic advisor in their chosen area of study.

Pre-Dentistry

(Code 705-900)

Advisors: W. Gallagher (Chemistry), J. Halfen (Chemistry), J. Lyman Gingerich (Biology).

Students should plan to spend at least three years in pre-professional work. Many pre-dentistry students complete a B.S. degree in biology or chemistry. A typical first-year program includes:

Select one of the following:8
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
OR
Chemical Principles
and Quantitative Analysis
Required:
BIOL 221Foundations of Biology I4
MATH 109Algebra for Calculus (and/or MATH 112/MATH 113, and/or MATH 114)4
PSYC 100Introduction to Psychology3
Completion of University Writing Requirement
Advanced courses
Select one of the following:9-10
General Physics
and General Physics
OR
University Physics I
and University Physics II
Required:
CHEM 325Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory4
CHEM 326Organic Chemistry II with Laboratory4

Consult an advisor for further recommendations.

NOTE: Students should plan on taking the DAT (Dental Admissions Test) in the late spring or early summer of the year prior to the year for which they are seeking to matriculate in dental school.

Pre-Engineering

(Code 195-900)

Advisors:
Chemical—S. Drucker (Chemistry).
Civil—L. Ford (Physics and Astronomy).
Electrical—M. Evans (Physics and Astronomy).
General—M. Evans (Physics and Astronomy), L. Ford (Physics and Astronomy).
Mechanical—M. Evans (Physics and Astronomy).

NOTE: High school preparation should include as much algebra, trigonometry, and advanced mathematics as possible as well as courses in chemistry and physics.

Students should plan to transfer after two years at UW-Eau Claire unless they decide to pursue the Dual Degree Engineering Emphasis in Physics or the Dual Degree Geological Engineering Emphasis in Geology. Required freshman and sophomore courses include:

MATH 114Calculus I4
MATH 215Calculus II4
MATH 216Calculus III4
PHYS 231University Physics I5
PHYS 232University Physics II5

Many fields of engineering also require chemistry, statics, dynamics, differential equations, and computer programming. Students should be aware that many engineering schools require GPAs of 2.50 or higher to be admitted to the junior year. Consult a pre-engineering advisor, because specific course and grade requirements vary among engineering fields as well as among schools of engineering.

Pre-Law

(Code 425-900)

Advisors: M. Gilkison (Political Science), E. Kasper (Political Science), M. Meyer (Philosophy and Religious Studies), P. Myers (Political Science).

Students should plan to complete a baccalaureate degree before applying for law school admission and may choose from any major program of study. Choice of major and minor fields should be done with the following information in mind, including consideration of an alternative career plan. In addition to meeting with their major advisor, students should meet with one of the Pre-law advisers early in their first semester. The American Bar Association recommends that future lawyers select a major that develops skills in reading and interpreting texts, research and writing. The skills most valued in law school are analytic and problem-solving skills and courses that challenge the student in these areas are recommended. Law school admissions are based on successful completion of the undergraduate degree and scores on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), along with other criteria set by particular programs. Studies show that students in the following majors consistently score highly on the LSAT: Economics, Finance, History, Literature, Philosophy, Physics/Math, Political Science, and Religious Studies. Courses which are recommended, regardless of major, are:

ACCT 201Principles of Accounting I3
ANTH 422Anthropology of Law3
BSAD 305Legal and Regulatory Environment2
or BSAD 306 Business Law
CJ 414Mass Media Law3
ECON 103Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 104Principles of Macroeconomics3
ENGL 201Advanced College Writing3
MATH 111A Short Course in Calculus (and/or MATH 246)4
PHIL 150Logic and Critical Thinking3
PHIL 310Philosophy of Law3
POLS 110American National Politics3
And other courses dealing with the American political system

In addition, U.S. and world history courses, as well as ethics are recommended. Students may want to consider majoring in the Legal Studies emphasis in the Political Science Comprehensive Major or creating a topical minor in pre-law. To obtain Pre-Law designation, contact the Political Science department chair. This designation is in addition to major, minor, and certificate program designations.

NOTE 1: The LSAT should be taken early in the senior year (usually September or October).

NOTE 2: In addition to LSAT scores, interviews and recommendations play an important role in law school admissions.

NOTE 3: Students may want to be involved in Future Lawyers of America, the student organization for Pre-Law.

Pre-Medicine

(Code 706-900)

Advisors: J. Anderson (Biology), W. Bryant (Biology), W. Gallagher (Chemistry), D. Gingerich (Biology), J. Halfen (Chemistry), D. Janik (Biology), M. Kettler (Biology), J. Rohrer (Biology).

The pre-med curriculum consists of those courses needed to meet the entrance requirements for the majority of medical schools and to prepare students to take the Medical College Admission Test. The majority of students should plan to complete the requirements for a baccalaureate degree. Because of the competition for available places, students are urged to plan programs that will permit alternative career choices if acceptance into medical school is not secured. Typical first-year courses include:

BIOL 221Foundations of Biology I4
Select one of the following:8-10
Chemical Principles
and Quantitative Analysis
OR
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
Required:
One or two semesters of mathematics
Completion of the University Writing Requirement

Consult an advisor for further recommendations.

NOTE 1: CHEM 103 will not apply toward the completion of a biochemistry/molecular biology major.

NOTE 2: Entry into medical schools is based on the following:

  1. the student’s academic record,
  2. the results of the Medical College Admission Test, which should be taken in the spring of the junior year,
  3. recommendations, and
  4. interviews.

NOTE 3: A limited number of scholarships are available for sophomore, junior, and senior pre-medicine students who meet the scholarship criteria.

Pre-Occupational Therapy

(Code 665-900)

Advisor: M. Mattes (Kinesiology).

The pre-occupational therapy program is intended to prepare students for admission into a graduate program in occupational therapy. Most occupational therapy programs are now at the graduate level. Students should plan on completing a baccalaureate degree before applying to occupational therapy graduate programs. Because the specific requirements of professional schools vary considerably, students should obtain current academic catalogs from the schools in which they are interested. The pre-occupational therapy program is an advising track and not a major, minor, or certificate program. Interested students should select an appropriate major in consultation with an academic advisor in their chosen area of study.

Pre-Optometry

(Code 703-900)

Advisor: D. Janik (Biology).

Students should plan to spend at least two years in undergraduate study; the majority of successful applicants have three or four years of college work. A typical first-year program includes:

BIOL 221Foundations of Biology I4
Select one of the following:6-8
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
OR
Chemical Principles
Mathematics course
Completion of the University Writing Requirement

Consult an advisor for further recommendations.

NOTE: The Optometry Admission Test should be taken before the semester in which the student applies for acceptance into a school of optometry. Because of competition for the available places, students are urged to plan programs that will permit alternative career choices if acceptance into an optometry school is not secured.

Pre-Pharmacy

(Code 685-900)

Advisors: S. Bailey-Hartsel (Chemistry), C. Muller (Chemistry), K. Wiegel (Chemistry).

The pre-pharmacy curriculum blends science and math courses with social science and humanities courses in order to prepare future pharmacists to address medical problems with the people they will serve. Most students now admitted to pharmacy schools enter with a bachelor’s degree, so students should plan to choose a major to be more competitive. A first-year program should include:

Select one of the following:6-8
Chemical Principles
OR
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
Required:
MATH 114Calculus I4
Select one of the following:4-8
Foundations of Biology I
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
and Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Select one or more of the following:3
Principles of Microeconomics
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Required:
Completion of the University Writing Requirement

The minimum course work admission requirements could be planned in two years if the student is prepared to start in CHEM 115 and MATH 114. More time should be allowed if the student starts in a lower level math course or takes the CHEM 103/CHEM 104 sequence. The GPA of students admitted into pharmacy school is typically above 3.50. Pharmacy schools are increasingly emphasizing communication, leadership, and community service in their admissions criteria, so students should pace their work at UW-Eau Claire to develop strong records in both academics and community service. Experience as a pharmacy technician is also helpful. Consult an advisor for information about the Student Pharmaceutical Society and pharmacy school admissions requirements.

Pre-Physical Therapy

(Code 662-900)

Advisor: M. Mattes (Kinesiology).

The pre-physical therapy program is intended to prepare students for admission into a graduate program in physical therapy. Most physical therapy programs are now at the graduate level. Students should plan on completing a baccalaureate degree before applying to physical therapy graduate programs. Because the specific requirements of professional schools vary considerably, students should obtain current academic catalogs from the schools in which they are interested. The pre-physical therapy program is an advising track and not a major, minor, or certificate program. Interested students should select an appropriate major in consultation with an academic advisor in their chosen area of study.

Pre-Physician Assistant

(Code 707-900)

Advisors: D. Herman (Biology), D. Janik (Biology).

Most physician assistant programs are now at the graduate level (M.S.). Students should plan on completing a baccalaureate degree before applying to physician assistant graduate programs. Specific requirements for admission will vary among programs, and students are encouraged to consult the specific program catalog for these requirements. In preparation, students should take two semesters of chemistry, two semesters of physics, precalculus/calculus, biology courses including organismal form and function, microbiology, two semesters of anatomy and physiology, psychology courses, and a communication course. Other courses may be required. Consult with an advisor for further recommendations and information, including information about regional program requirements.

Pre-Veterinary Medicine

(Code 708-900)

Advisor: S. Showsh (Biology).

Students should plan to spend at least three years in pre-professional work. Many students complete a B.S. degree. A typical first-year program includes:

BIOL 221Foundations of Biology I4
Select one of the following:8-10
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
OR
Chemical Principles
and Quantitative Analysis
Required:
MATH 114Calculus I4
Completion of University Writing Requirement

Consult an advisor for further recommendations.

NOTE: Most schools of veterinary medicine require experience with animals, such as that gained through a farm background or working as assistant to a veterinarian, as well as the completion of the general test of the Graduate Record Examination. Because of competition for the available places, students are urged to plan a degree program that will permit alternative career choices if acceptance into a school of veterinary medicine is not secured.